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Fans Hurt at Oklahoma Back Street Boys Concert

At least 14 people have been injured and transported to hospitals after trusses holding up the entrance to a resort where the Backstreet Boys were set to begin a concert in Oklahoma collapsed. WinStar World Casino and Resort says in a statement posted on Twitter Saturday that the resort began an evacuation at about 5 p.m. when lightning was within four miles of the casino. The company says about 150 patrons did not evacuate and when the storm hit with 70-80 mph ) winds, it knocked over...

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Wikimedia

Soggy Sunday for Tulsa

Widespread showers and thunderstorms will move across the area this morning as a strong upper level storm system moves slowly east across the central plains. Locally heavy rainfall is possible this morning, especially in northeast Oklahoma and northwest Arkansas, but severe weather is not likely with this morning activity. Scattered thunderstorms are expected to develop later this afternoon into this evening as a cold front approaches from the northwest. A few of these storms may become...

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South Koreans Prepare For Rare Family Reunions With Long-Lost Relatives In The North

In August 1950, 14-year-old Ahn Seung-choon was still asleep at home early one morning when her mother woke her up, screaming that her 17-year-old brother had been taken by North Korean soldiers. "Someone took your brother, and you are still sleeping!" Ahn recalls her mother shouting. Her mother had tried to chase the boy and his abductors, but she had babies to take care of at home and couldn't follow them for long. "After that day, we didn't hear anything about him," Ahn says 68 years later...

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Chicago Tribune

On the Next ATJ: Anat Cohen, John Hicks, Cory Henry, Kenny Wheeler, Sophie Milman, and More

Listen for the next broadcast of All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 18th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. It'll be three solid hours of can't-miss modern jazz -- all of it introduced, contextualized, and lovingly selected by an actual person (i.e., not by a robot)! We’ll listen back to a fine broadcast that fisrt aired in May of 2016 as we hear from John Hicks, Sophie Milman, Cory Henry, Weather Report, Dave Brubeck, Kenny Wheeler, GoGo Penguin, and Anat Cohen (shown here...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest today is John Pavlovitz, a progressive Christian pastor, writer and activist from Raleigh, North Carolina. He's the author of the popular blog, "Stuff That Needs To Be Said," that offers advice and admonitions for Christians living in the era of Trump. His following on the blog has led to him being called the "digital pastor of the resistance".

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa has written a comprehensive account of the financial crisis of 2008, it's roots that go back decades, and how it spawned further economic and political crises in the years since, from Brexit and the Euro-crisis in Greece, to the conflict in Ukraine, and rise of economic nationalism in the U-S, and throughout Europe. Adam Tooze is a Professor of History at Columbia University and author of "The Deluge" and "The Wages of Destruction", both award-winning economic histories of the world after World War I, and Nazi Germany respectively.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we feature our interview with Tulsa Arts Fellowship writer Anna Badkhen. Badkhen has been a journalist and war correspondent in many of the world's conflict areas in this century, and the author of six books of literary non-fiction about the remarkable people she has met in her travels; families who due to conflict, globalization, or climate change, find their way of life on a knife's edge.

On this encore edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend.

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In a series of tweets over the weekend, President Trump responded to a story published in The New York Times, that detailed extensive cooperation between White House counsel Donald McGahn, and the inquiry by special counsel Robert Mueller into obstruction of justice and possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Sydney Stavinoha-Twitter

At least 14 people have been injured and transported to hospitals after trusses holding up the entrance to a resort where the Backstreet Boys were set to begin a concert in Oklahoma collapsed.

WinStar World Casino and Resort says in a statement posted on Twitter Saturday that the resort began an evacuation at about 5 p.m. when lightning was within four miles of the casino.

Michael Doody remembers some things about his Columbus, Ohio neighborhood in the 1990s:

"Gunshots, helicopters, thefts, smashed out windows, burglaries, robberies, assaults and murders."

In addition to the crime, roughly 50 percent of the children were living in poverty in this area, known as Southern Orchards.

During the mid-20th century, construction of an interstate through the middle of the community separated many of the neighborhood's majority black residents from job opportunities in downtown Columbus.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson is accusing tech behemoth Facebook of engaging in housing discrimination, according to a complaint filed on Friday.

In it, HUD says the social media giant allows landlords and home sellers access to advertising tools that limit which prospective buyers or tenants can view certain online ads based on race, religion, sex, disability and other characteristics.

In August 1950, 14-year-old Ahn Seung-choon was still asleep at home early one morning when her mother woke her up, screaming that her 17-year-old brother had been taken by North Korean soldiers.

"Someone took your brother, and you are still sleeping!" Ahn recalls her mother shouting. Her mother had tried to chase the boy and his abductors, but she had babies to take care of at home and couldn't follow them for long.

"After that day, we didn't hear anything about him," Ahn says 68 years later in Suwon, a city south of the capital Seoul.

Like their counterparts across the country, Wisconsin Democrats eager to win back the House and make gains in the Senate have been watching primary election voter turnout with bated breath. This week, they found reason to be hopeful: turnout in the state's primary on Tuesday soared to its highest level since 2002, with a surge in Democratic votes.

What's it like to live in Honduras today — and why do so many people want to leave?

Those are the questions that photojournalist Tomas Ayuso, who grew up in the Central American country, explores in a project he calls "The Right To Grow Old."

Imran Khan was sworn in Saturday as Pakistan's new Prime Minister, ushering in a new era in the country. The legendary cricket star and international playboy turned politician was voted in with a slim majority – just 51 percent of the vote — and allegations of election meddling and voter irregularities.

In an emotional speech after the vote, Khan repeated a campaign theme of vowing to stamp out corruption. On Saturday Khan approved his cabinet, and appointed one of his top aides, Shireen Mazari, to minister designate of human rights.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

It's been almost 20 years since Matt Groening, creator of The Simpsons, has released a new show. He last did it in 1999 with his sci-fi comedy Futurama. But he says, it hasn't been all work since then.

"I love playing," Groening says. "I love inventing worlds."

As it turns out, Groening has been dreaming up a new universe almost all of that time. His new show Disenchantment is an animated fantasy set in the medieval kingdom of Dreamland.

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